TJ Expert

TJ Expert (102)

 

 

JAPANESE BUSINESS MASAKATSU MORI

 |  Published in Japanese Business Expert

Former Accenture Chairman Masakatsu Mori, shares his 30 years experience of advising many of Japan's leading corporations as well as foreign corporations doing business in Japan and beyond.

TJ: Companies in Japan are revolutionizing the meaning of globalization by making English the official language of their headquarters, even while others are remaining domestic- minded by not promoting English in the workplace. What are your thoughts on these approaches, and which approach do you think is needed for Japan? On another note, why do you think Japan has been struggling with competition from companies in China and South Korea, and what can Japan do to remain competitive?

Mori: Japanese corporations have accumulated a wealth of capital and technology, with the total in accumulated cash at US$2.5 trillion. Japanese companies hold the top five spots for highest patent values in the world. Even so, the number of business leaders able to do business in the global market lags behind other major countries. The development of executives who can harness Japan’s huge capital and technological resources for doing business in the global market is a national priority. Two young companies are leading this charge: Fast Retailing and Rakuten. They are challenging Japanese corporations by aggressively transforming into global players with sustainable growth. This is leaving its mark on traditional companies, albeit gradually. More companies are starting to consider at least minimum TOIEC scores before hiring new employees and promoting others to management positions. Being able to speak English and understand different cultures and business habits are now seen as keys for success in the global marketplace.

GLOBAL EDUCATOR DAVID NUNAN

Written by  |  Published in Language & Education

World-acclaimed linguist and language educator Dr. David Nunan shares his own personal learning experiences from his 30 years in the classroom.

Only connect

ONE of the joys of being an English language teacher for non-native English speakers is the opportunity to meet a diversity of individuals from different cultures and walks of life. Over the years, I have taught (and learned from) thousands of students of all ages and backgrounds. Occasionally I bump into former students and listen eagerly to the stories they tell me about their lives, from their successes and failures to their triumphs and tragedies. Once or twice at the end of a conversation, a former student has said, “Thank you for teaching me. You changed my life.” Hyperbole, perhaps, but for a teacher nothing is more rewarding than that from a former student.

HAITIAN EXPERT MARCEL DURET

Written by  |  Published in Haitian Culture & Politics

Former Ambassador to Japan from Haiti (1991-2003) Marcel Duret provides political and social commentary from Haiti expressing his unique perspective on Caribbean culture and politics.

A Haitian Perspective


Congratulations President Chavez

THE destiny of Venezuela’s many underprivileged people was on the line during the October 2012 presidential election, and they were able to influence the outcome by voting for incumbent Hugo Chavez. In Haiti, the ever increasing percentage of people living under the poverty level were unaware that things could have got worse for them if Chavez had lost. Haitian people may take to the street to celebrate when the Brazilian national soccer team wins, but there was not even as much as a sigh of relief from the general population when the news came that Chavez had won the election. Is it because they do not know of the invaluable contribution Chavez has been making to Haiti’s state budget? Or is it because so far the money has not reached them or spurred major changes to better their livelihoods? Thanks to the clairvoyance of Rene Preval, Haiti’s former two-term president, Haiti dared to forge a relationship with Chavez.

Parenting with Lorraine

Written by  |  Published in Parenting

30-year veteran Marriage Family and Child Therapist and mother of 5 assists parents in acquiring skills that enhance their ability to raise high-functioning and happy children.

Respect

What outcome are we aiming for?

It is almost universally agreed that the most important job in the world is raising a child, and yet, it is often something we undertake without any preparation. Generally, we parent as we were parented and sometimes this leads to a positive outcome. However, we are not always clear about what outcome we are aiming for.

Blind obedience?

Do we want our children to be blindly obedient? In some cases, “yes.” For example when we shout “STOP” when our child is about to step into oncoming traffic without looking. But how about when we call them to come to us when they are in the middle of some task that is important to them? Are we willing to hear “just a minute, I’m playing a video game.” For some, that is a natural and acceptable response. For others it may feel like defiance. What makes for that difference in our reaction? Generally, it is in the tone of the relationship we have developed with that child.



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